HMMMM. Credit Unions Send Emails: "Your Money is Safe . . ."

HMMMM. Credit Unions Send Emails: "Your Money is Safe . . ."
19 Comments

Every once in awhile, an entity does something that, on its face, may seem reasonable, but upon closer scrutiny, signals trouble.  Such seems to be the case with Credit Unions . . .

UNITUS Community Credit Union has sent an email to its members advising them that their money is safe . . . . and besides, it's insured . . . . .    Upon receiving this, a lot of members went "Uh Oh."

Here is the email in its entirety:

 

 

DIFFERENT CREDIT UNION: ONLINE SYSTEM "OUTAGE"

 The "everything's fine" email above comes as another credit union, First Flight, sent an email to its members advising their Online Banking System was suffering an "Outage."  That notice appears below:

 

So . . . . . . if everything is just fine, why the email?  If the Online system "Outage" will be fixed fast, why the notice?

Some folks are wondering if everything ISN'T just fine.  Others are also wondering, is it just UNITAS and First Flight Credit Unions?  Is it ALL of them?  

 

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  • This commment is unpublished.
    j Branch · 18 days ago
    I just received an email from my Credit Union. It goes like this...


    Your Money is Safe and Insured
    Still Focused on Serving You
    We are still here to help you

    You and your family may be worried about the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), but the leadership at ****** Credit Union want you to know we are here for you as we always have been. Your deposits are safe and insured. We’re not going anywhere, because at its core, our credit union is not a building or a business, it’s people unified for a common goal.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Deborah Cresswell · 18 days ago
      And your problem with this message is what?
      • This commment is unpublished.
        Deborah Cresswell · 18 days ago
        Watch the movie "Its a Wonderful Life". If it is still not clear, then let me know what questions you have.
        • This commment is unpublished.
          j Branch · 18 days ago
          Excerpt...
          March 22, 2020
          “... Swiss gold refiners, which produce 70% of the world’s gold, have just been ordered to halt production!”

          “The world will now see massive handouts to individuals and corporations, rescues of over-leveraged banks and hedge funds plus rapidly surging government deficits. But who is going to pay for it? The printing press – stupid! Who else. The printing press has gotten the world into this financial disaster in the first place and all that is needed now is to speed it up 100x or more.”
          STOCKS WILL GO DOWN BY 90% FASTER THAN IN 1929-32

          https://kingworldnews.com/breaking-egon-von-greyerz-just-warned-swiss-gold-refiners-have-ceased-production/

          (U.S. MINT ,AND CANADIAN MINT NOT SHIPPING EITHER! SPOT PRICE IS IRRELEVANT ! )


          Watching an old Jimmy Stewart movie will not change anything here.
          • This commment is unpublished.
            j Branch · 18 days ago
            ** P.S. The word "stupid" in the above post is not directed at any person here. It is part of the news article that the above excerpt originated from.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Daniel Laurino · 18 days ago
    Deborah, I am not a financially rich or wealthy man but the money I have been able to save by living a very frugal life I do not want taken from me when the banks bail themselves out with tax payers accounts or when there is an alleged "cyber attack" in which the culprit is not known and thr bank can't figure anything out for months while you have no money to spend withyour plastic cards, or an EMP happens and we can't access atms, online banking, or use, debit/credit cards at stores. Regardless, you are either very ignorant of the writing that is on the wall and/or you are a liberal trolling this website or both. Either way I feel sorry for you because you sound like you won't be able to survive very long because your survival insticts appear to be terrible. And don't you worry, my household is well protected by God's Holy angels who have charge over me and my dwelling but should the Lord want me to join the action I shall be ready indeed. The question is will you be ready?
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Deborah Cresswell · 18 days ago
      I am a devoted Christian, and I KNOW that Psalm 91 has me personally covered. I pray for Trump DAILY and worked on his campaign in 2016 and in the midterms. What did YOU do??

      I also spent 30 some years as an CPA Auditor in Banks, so I know a bit about how they work, and how management thinks, and what their priorities are, and what they are going through to keep things going. In fact my job was to audit them and determine how well they have prepared for contingencies like this. If they flunked the audit, they got fired.

      When has there ever been a cyber attack where the banks were unable to figure out how much money is in YOUR bank account? Banks back up their databases, FREQUENTLY, they run simultaneous, live real time back ups. They have to, it is required.

      EMP attacks? Where is this coming from???

      This is an hysterical post, by someone who is NOT hearing from or trusting in God.

      What does GOD say???? "The sky is falling, its all over??? Cash in your chips?"

      No, God says He has things under control, and YOU are to FEAR NOT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      WHO are YOU listening to????

      I have PEACE. I KNOW God sees the end from the beginning, and we are going to be OK. Why? Because God is still on the throne, and consequently GOD is still in control.

      Your job is to seek God, prepare for these bumps in the road that we are ALL going through, but God says: "Do YOU trust ME???" Or do YOU put your trust in Mammon????

      I distinctly remember God telling us all:

      5Let your gentleness be apparent to all. The Lord is near.

      6Be anxious for nothing, but in everything, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God.

      7And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.…Philippians 4:6

      DOES THIS SCRIPTURE RING A BELL?????
      • This commment is unpublished.
        Grim · 17 days ago
        Deborah, I'm sure God is very appreciative of you wielding his name like a baseball bat and attempting to beat others over the head with him. You're obviously a very smug, self-righteous, angry person, who may read the bible and know the scriptures, but it's obvious you didn't learn a thing. However, I'm going to give you the benefit of the doubt and assume your blizzard of angry, clueless posts on this site, actually stem from the fact that inside, you're currently a very frightened, insecure person.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Bob · 18 days ago
    We got one from Golden 1 credit union and Tri Counties bank. Bank closing some branches and limiting hours at the rest. In Northern California.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Deborah Cresswell · 18 days ago
      I just read the notice. They offered to provide customers with additional credit (loans) if they need it due to COVID19. The bank is closing some locations, and reducing their hours. What is so surprising about that? 1) They don't want their experienced banking staff to get sick. 2) Most people are supposed to be staying home, and in many states can't go to work. So commerce comes to a grinding halt. Are they suppose to have tellers showing up for work and sitting their twiddling their thumbs for hours??? They are adjusting to the drop in demand.

      Most people bank online these days. During a deadly pandemic it is much safer for everyone to do your banking online.....pay your bills online, etc.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Jennifer Mott · 18 days ago
    I got something similar from Captial One and US Bank. Makes me nervous when I see this stuff.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Deborah Cresswell · 18 days ago
      I just read the notice. They offered to provide customers with additional credit (loans) if they need it due to COVID19. The bank is closing some locations, and reducing their hours. What is so surprising about that? 1) They don't want their experienced banking staff to get sick. 2) Most people are supposed to be staying home, and in many states can't go to work. So commerce comes to a grinding halt. Are they suppose to have tellers showing up for work and sitting their twiddling their thumbs for hours??? They are adjusting to the drop in demand.

      Most people bank online these days. During a deadly pandemic it is much safer for everyone to do your banking online.....pay your bills online, etc.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Daniel Laurino · 18 days ago
    Look at the notification I got earlier today from TD bank I believe this is phase 1 before ppl can't access or take out their cash. Basically lets TD bank customers know alot of stores will be closing and those that don't close will have shorter hours. I was notified by text message let me state I have NEVER received a text from TD bank and I have never enrolled with TD online banking. Luckily, I was already adhering to Hal's advice over a month ago to start slowly taking money out so I only have the minimum you need to avoid having any type of fees. I hope everyone else has been heeding the warning as well. Thanks again Hal!

    https://www.td.com/us/en/personal-banking/COVID-19/
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Deborah Cresswell · 18 days ago
      I just read the notice. They offered to provide customers with additional credit (loans) if they need it due to COVID19. The bank is closing some locations, and reducing their hours. What is so surprising about that? 1) They don't want their experienced banking staff to get sick. 2) Most people are supposed to be staying home, and in many states can't go to work. So commerce comes to a grinding halt. Are they suppose to have tellers showing up for work and sitting their twiddling their thumbs for hours??? They are adjusting to the drop in demand.

      Most people bank online these days. During a deadly pandemic it is much safer for everyone to do your banking online.....pay your bills online, etc.

      So what are you going to do with your pile of COVID19 infected dollar bills? Where are you going to spend it, if all the stores and nonessential businesses are all closed, and you are supposed to stay home? Play monopoly with it? And don't forget with your cash at home, it is more vulnerable to robbers and thieves. I hope you at least bought a gun and lots of ammo with some of that cash.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Roberta Bogner · 18 days ago
    So First Flight's "online banking provider" has the outage? I dont do online banking, and wouldn't be happy to know that my bank was farming out their banking operations to someone else. I wonder if they all do that?
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Deborah Cresswell · 18 days ago
      Smaller banks often utilize the resources of larger banks or 3rd party providers.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Bob · 18 days ago
    Don 't mean to burst anyone's bubble, but, the FDIC doesn't have enough in reserves currently if multiple banks fail at once.
    http://www.mybudget360.com/fdic-insures-47-trillion-in-deposits-with-a-136-billion-deposit-insurance-fund-this-is-like-going-into-a-hurricane-with-a-99-cent-store-umbrella/
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Deborah Cresswell · 18 days ago
      Yes, we had the exact same problem during the 2008 banking crisis. No one lost their FDIC insured deposits.

      Its like social security. People pay into it all their lives, so a big pot of money piles up, which Congress critters couldn't keep their mitts off of, so now all you hear is that SSA is suddenly "short" of funds. As usual the truth is otherwise. If necessary the FDIC will get a bail out. But most likely the banks will be the ones to get a bail out, like last time. In better times, the bail outs were repaid.

      Watch "Its a Wonderful Life".
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Jared Passenger · 18 days ago
    When they tell you not to panic, it's time to RUN!
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Gregg Walker · 18 days ago
    One glaring thing I don’t think anyone has mentioned here...


    Hal is back! I guess he’s okay after all.
    phew!
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Suzanne Rice · 18 days ago
      Yeah, I've been checking all day and was wondering what was going on when I didn't see any new articles.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    BU · 18 days ago
    Hush little peon don’t be afraid, your banking institution is holding you pay.
    Please do try to remove your money there’s nothing wrong even though that sounds a bit funny. And when you finally know we’re broke, our CEO will be long gone while you have a stroke. It’s not our fault Your country printed fake cash, won’t be long before your kicked out on your ass. So sharpen your pitch fork and light Light your torch meet you in DC on our Nations front porch...
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Deborah Cresswell · 18 days ago
      Your deposits are insured by the FDIC up to $250,000/bank, $500,000 for a joint a/c.

      Banks don't normally fall over night. They go on watch lists for months before hand and are closely monitored by the Fed, so that IF they do fail, a process is rapidly put into place, to move your account to a more stable bank, or you get a check in the mail from the Federal Gov't. This all happens within one or two days. Normally the bank will be closed on a Friday, and by Monday a new bank is handling your account and your funds are available to you.

      Q: What happens when a bank fails?

      A: Though unlikely, bank failures do occur and the FDIC responds in two capacities. First, as the insurer of the bank's deposits, the FDIC pays insurance to depositors up to the insurance limit. Historically, the FDIC pays insurance within a few days after a bank closing, usually the next business day, by either (1) providing each depositor with a new account at another insured bank in an amount equal to the insured balance of their account at the failed bank, or (2) by issuing a check to each depositor for the insured balance of their account at the failed bank.

      Some deposits that exceed $250,000 and are linked to trust documents or deposits established by a third party broker may have a short wait so that their accounts can be reviewed to determine the amount of deposit insurance coverage available to them. The amount of time involved depends on how long it takes for the depositor to provide supplemental information to the FDIC so that we can complete the insurance determination.

      Second, as the receiver of the failed bank, the FDIC assumes the task of selling/collecting the assets of the failed bank and settling its debts, including claims for deposits in excess of the insured limit. If a depositor has uninsured funds they receive the insured portion of their funds quickly, as described above. They may also, however, recover some portion of their uninsured funds (their remaining claim on the failed bank) from the proceeds from the sale of failed bank assets. It can take several years to sell off the assets of a failed bank. As assets are sold, however, depositors who had uninsured funds usually receive periodic payments (on a pro-rata "cents on the dollar" basis) on their remaining claim.

      More here:

      https://www.fdic.gov/deposit/deposits/faq.html
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Grim · 18 days ago
    Remember folks, due to the changes put into place in the banking rules a few years ago, if your financial institution folds, you might think you would be an *insured depositor*, when in fact, you're actually an *uninsured lender*. Think about that and adjust your account balances accordingly.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      BRIAN KEANE · 17 days ago
      correct-in Canada Fed budget 2013 Conservtive Finance Minister Flatterly( RIP)buried arund article 63 definitely said much the same;; e.g depositor haircuts because Banks (big 5or6 up here) too important to fail. Side note but related Mark Carney took what some thought was a demotion from head of Bank of Canada (right!) to equilivalant "bank of over-night settlements" Canada wise about 17 largest, big 6 plus a few credit unins like Desjardin and Canada came through 2008-09 relatively well best G7 depending on definition/criteria for best, then went Head Bank of England giggles) and just last month was BIS? or Davos crowd Green Fund Criteria -key point is DEPOSITS are insured; you/me/bank "depositor" are LENDERS not depositors so quess where apro 1% of total eposits goes?
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Deborah Cresswell · 18 days ago
      The first $250,000 in your bank is fully insured by the U.S. gov't, and if your bank fails, you will be paid in a day or two. Most likely, your funds will get moved to a larger bank, and readily available to you.

      Q: What is the FDIC?

      A: The FDIC (Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation) is an independent agency of the United States government that protects you against the loss of your insured deposits if an FDIC-insured bank or savings association fails. FDIC insurance is backed by the full faith and credit of the United States government.

      Q: What is deposit insurance?

      A: FDIC deposit insurance covers the depositors of a failed FDIC-insured depository institution dollar-for-dollar, principal plus any interest accrued or due to the depositor, through the date of default, up to at least $250,000. For example, if a person had a CD account in her name alone with a principal balance of $195,000 and $3,000 in accrued interest, the full $198,000 would be insured, since principal plus interest did not exceed the $250,000 insurance limit for single ownership accounts.

      Q: What happens when a bank fails?

      A: Though unlikely, bank failures do occur and the FDIC responds in two capacities. First, as the insurer of the bank's deposits, the FDIC pays insurance to depositors up to the insurance limit. Historically, the FDIC pays insurance within a few days after a bank closing, usually the next business day, by either (1) providing each depositor with a new account at another insured bank in an amount equal to the insured balance of their account at the failed bank, or (2) by issuing a check to each depositor for the insured balance of their account at the failed bank.

      Some deposits that exceed $250,000 and are linked to trust documents or deposits established by a third party broker may have a short wait so that their accounts can be reviewed to determine the amount of deposit insurance coverage available to them. The amount of time involved depends on how long it takes for the depositor to provide supplemental information to the FDIC so that we can complete the insurance determination.

      Second, as the receiver of the failed bank, the FDIC assumes the task of selling/collecting the assets of the failed bank and settling its debts, including claims for deposits in excess of the insured limit. If a depositor has uninsured funds they receive the insured portion of their funds quickly, as described above. They may also, however, recover some portion of their uninsured funds (their remaining claim on the failed bank) from the proceeds from the sale of failed bank assets. It can take several years to sell off the assets of a failed bank. As assets are sold, however, depositors who had uninsured funds usually receive periodic payments (on a pro-rata "cents on the dollar" basis) on their remaining claim.

      Q: How can I get deposit insurance?

      A: Depositors do not need to apply for FDIC insurance. Coverage is automatic whenever a deposit account is opened at an FDIC-insured bank. If you want your funds insured by the FDIC, simply make sure you are placing your funds in a deposit account at an FDIC-insured bank and that your deposit does not exceed the insurance limit for that ownership category.

      Q: How do I find out if a bank is FDIC-insured?

      A: To determine if a bank is FDIC-insured, you can ask a bank representative, look for the FDIC sign at your bank, call the FDIC at 877-275-3342, or you can use the FDIC's BankFind tool. BankFind allows you to access detailed information about all FDIC-insured institutions, including branch locations, the bank's official website address, the current operating status of your bank, and the regulator to contact for additional information and assistance.
      Coverage

      Q: How much deposit insurance coverage do I qualify for?

      A: The standard deposit insurance amount is $250,000 per depositor, per FDIC-insured bank, per ownership category. For a basic category-by-category overview of FDIC deposit insurance coverage, you can use the Account Categories tool.

      The "Your Insured Deposits" brochure also includes more comprehensive information and examples of deposit insurance coverage for various ownership categories. You can also access the FDIC's Electronic Deposit Insurance Estimator (EDIE) to get details about your specific situation.

      Q: Is every financial product at a bank covered by the FDIC?

      A: No, FDIC deposit insurance coverage depends on whether your chosen financial product is a deposit product. The FDIC covers the traditional types of bank deposit accounts – including checking and savings accounts, money market deposit accounts (MMDAs), and certificates of deposit (CDs). Investment products that are not deposits, such as mutual funds, annuities, life insurance policies and stocks and bonds are not covered by FDIC deposit insurance.

      For a more comprehensive list of financial products that are insured by the FDIC and financial products that are not insured by the FDIC, visit Accounts Covered by the FDIC

      Q: Can I have more than $250,000 of deposit insurance coverage at one FDIC-insured bank?

      A: Yes. The FDIC insures deposits according to the ownership category in which the funds are insured and how the accounts are titled. The standard deposit insurance coverage limit is $250,000 per depositor, per FDIC-insured bank, per ownership category. Deposits held in different ownership categories are separately insured, up to at least $250,000, even if held at the same bank. For example, a revocable trust account (including living trusts and informal revocable trusts commonly referred to as payable on death (POD) accounts) with one owner naming three unique beneficiaries can be insured up to $750,000. See the Your Insured Deposit brochure for details.

      Q: Can I check to see if my accounts are fully covered?

      A: Yes, you can get detailed information about your specific deposit insurance coverage by accessing the FDIC's Electronic Deposit Insurance Estimator (EDIE) and entering information about your accounts. You can also call the FDIC at 1-877-ASK-FDIC (1-877-275-3342) and ask to speak to an FDIC deposit insurance specialist.

      To determine your deposit insurance coverage or ask any other specific deposit insurance questions, call 1-877-ASK-FDIC (1-877-275-3342).

      https://www.fdic.gov/deposit/deposits/faq.html
      • This commment is unpublished.
        Carl Goldsworthy · 18 days ago
        I read that (copy & paste) from the current FDIC website. My pension was under strict legal rules by the gov of Ireland. 2008 crash, banks bailed out, new rules. The amount of money I got if I took out funds early dropped. Then a tax took a percentage each year. Then I retired, only to find the gov had not regulated the fund properly, and I was / am 25,000 euros short. The gov can and does change the laws whenever they want - including retrospectively.
        Trash cash, get real solid assets. At current rates of printing trillions a week, inflation will soon make the Weimar republic look good.
        • This commment is unpublished.
          Deborah Cresswell · 18 days ago
          I can't speak for Ireland. I've never worked there, nor do I know what laws that have been put into place to protect depositors.
        • This commment is unpublished.
          Grim · 18 days ago
          At this point, being in the Weimar Republic would be preferable to the trip to Zimbabwe that we currently find ourselves on.
          • This commment is unpublished.
            Deborah Cresswell · 18 days ago
            Have you banked in Zimbabwe or even been there?
            • This commment is unpublished.
              Grim · 17 days ago
              Deborah, while I try to live and let live with most people's comments on here, you should really educate yourself about subjects being spoken about before you comment. As to my comment about Zimbabwe, yes I've been there several times over the years. However, you seem to be insinuating that I was somehow making a *racist* comment, which was not the case at all.

              What I was talking about, is that Zimbabwe is the poster child for what world record setting hyper-inflation and money printing can do to your economy. Their inflation spiral ignited in Feb 2007. During 08-09, their inflation was estimated at 79.6 billion percent per month, peaking in Nov 08 at 89.7 sextillion percent per month. During this disaster, their highest denomination of printed currency reached the equivalent of a 100 billion dollar note.
          • This commment is unpublished.
            Carl Goldsworthy · 18 days ago
            (bomb)Yup, Trump is taking you for a Mug-abe
            • This commment is unpublished.
              Deborah Cresswell · 18 days ago
              Spoken like a true libtard.
              • This commment is unpublished.
                Carl Goldsworthy · 18 days ago
                Anyone who uses the word "Libtard" has already demonstrated their level of intelligence, and it's nothing to write home about.
                —The Christian Left
              • This commment is unpublished.
                Carl Goldsworthy · 18 days ago
                Had to look that one up.
                Good to see the banks have not laid everyone off.
      • This commment is unpublished.
        Grim · 18 days ago
        Yes, that's what it says, it was certainly true once and they're counting on you still believing it. At any rate, even if what you just wrote was still true, the FDIC currently only has enough funds to pay a very small percentage(+/-2%) of their obligations, should there be a systemic failure of the banking system. The banking rules I posted above were initiated, I believe in 2016. Look it up, or ignore it at your peril.
        • This commment is unpublished.
          Deborah Cresswell · 18 days ago
          Let's see, since the banks received bail outs during the 2008 "BANKING" crisis, and thus no depositors with insured deposits lost a dime, even though the FDIC at the time had insufficient funds to pay off all depositors, just like now, your point is what?

          Congressional critters "borrowed" from social security and there are never enough funds to pay off what people are owed who paid into it all their lives. I haven't heard of the social security going belly up, have you?

          ONLY depositors stupid enough to put in more than $250,000/bank "might" suffer a loss. How many readers on this website fall into that category? Stop fear mongering.

          If the Lawless Wicked Witch of the West (Hildabitch) were in the oval office, all bets would be off. But as it is, Trump is in the oval office, so you can be sure saner minds will prevail, and depositors will not be hurt, Trump will personally see to that.
          • This commment is unpublished.
            Grim · 17 days ago
            Deborah, I pity your ignorance, but it's quite obvious that you know less than nothing about how the *real* debt-based financial system in this country functions and what's about to happen during the end cycle of that system, which is currently happening. I pity you, because if you don't open your eyes soon, you can and will lose everything. However, I'm not a spiteful person like you seem to be, so I will simply wish you luck.
          • This commment is unpublished.
            Mike Fisch · 18 days ago
            The US financial system is a pyramid scheme based on debt, money printing and war. It will collapse.
        • This commment is unpublished.
          Carl Goldsworthy · 18 days ago
          Remember that after the 29 crash, all privately held US gold was taken by the gov - so if you buy it now, bury it !
          • This commment is unpublished.
            Grim · 18 days ago
            Yes, there'll be a lot of people who will discover the same thing folks did in 1933 and that's never store your gold in your bank safety deposit box. Back then, you couldn't open your box, unless a Fed banking rep was standing there to confiscate any gold that was inside. Only the people that kept it at home got to keep theirs.
            • This commment is unpublished.
              Carl Goldsworthy · 18 days ago
              I did not know that. Shit ! My safety deposit box is not a bank, still...I have it in mind to take my gold out in the next couple of years (5 year contract). Maybe I'll take it out early.
              • This commment is unpublished.
                Grim · 18 days ago
                If, you have it in a private bullion depository, those will be robbed by the government first. They like it when their victims concentrate their wealth and make the robbery easier.
                • This commment is unpublished.
                  Carl Goldsworthy · 18 days ago
                  The banks here in Ireland all gave up their safety box business (too close to being work). One ex banker saw the gap in the market and set up Merrion Vaults. Used as an alternative to home boxes for jewels, deeds, wills etc. All unchecked, so probably some Columbian marching powder too.I am guessing used by the local politicians etc, so probably safe from a state raid
              • This commment is unpublished.
                Carl Goldsworthy · 18 days ago
                PS Don't tell anyone it is a secret.
          • This commment is unpublished.
            Carl Goldsworthy · 18 days ago
            Which brings to mind the story of Alan Turing, the father of the modern computer, who left his academic job to run code breaking at Bletchley Park.. He was smart enough to buy silver and bury it in his garden. But not smart enough to remember where he buried it
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Deborah Cresswell · 18 days ago
    A lot of bank employees are being forced to work from home.....including their IT depts. They probably have skeleton crews on sight or on call, in case a server goes down. So if they have to physically dash to office, it might take longer than normal to resolve an outage.

    Banks are run by people, like you and me. Most banks have huge back office operations, where they use "bull pins" of cubicles, with people sitting close together. Not good for trying to stop the spread of this deadly disease. So no doubt they have moved to working in shifts, so that any point in time, you have fewer people on site to handle a crisis. I'd say, patience, not panic.
  • This commment is unpublished.
    CamoGloves · 18 days ago
    What else if BigBro doing behind the scenes of this coronavirus cover: An interesting article about the sneaky Dept Education forcing the 5G kill grid to be installed in schools nationwide when the schools are shut and no one is watching: https://www.takebackyourpower.net/5g-biometrics-covertly-installed-during-lockdown/
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Gregg Walker · 18 days ago
      What friggin’ scum! It’s not safe for your kids here. Staff is all sent home, and we are “cleaning”! Damn.

      I haven’t gotten over to the local schools yet, but it wouldn’t surprise me one bit.

      Every bit of this whole thing is one big F#%* the masses, Full Speed Ahead with New world order.

      Even if they succeed, they won’t have long to enjoy it. Maybe 7 years, but possibly only 3 1/2.

      I see this crap as :

      Revelation 12:12 “Therefore rejoice, ye heavens, and ye that dwell in them. Woe to the inhabiters of the earth and of the sea! for the devil is come down unto you, having great wrath, because he knoweth that he hath but a short time.“
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Ted Henry · 18 days ago
    SFFCU...State Farm Federal Credit Union is also down at this time as well...
  • This commment is unpublished.
    Mel Perry · 18 days ago
    What!?!!? All kinds of things are wrong here. Something is very, very wrong and it isn't the virus. Why has a whole 3 months of this virus given us the number of last WEEK'S flu deaths and not a word on the flu but shutting down the world over this bug??? After all the hype the real numbers now coming out showing this flu to be a lesser illness in almost every category......and we're willing to wreck the economy for it??!!?? Why is the DOJ requesting all kinds of new unconstitutional powers for a virus? Why is a silver bullet, Hydroxychloroquine, not already in wide spread use...its got 50 years of history and China published its effectiveness over a month ago in an intentional medical journal?? Why has this already been shown capable of stopping this virus in its tracks and nobody will use it....internationally!??!! This doesn't even scratch the surface of things wrong.
    • This commment is unpublished.
      Mel Perry · 18 days ago
      Now all kinds of financial institutions and markets are acting real squirrely. Expect upheaval...massive upheaval.
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    Charles g Hawley · 18 days ago
    It just seems reasonable that if the whole financial system comes crashing down credit unions would also. They have investments in the global system also.
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  • This commment is unpublished.
    Occams Razor · 18 days ago
    An apartment complex that I was staying at sent out a bulletin saying that The electronic payment system is no longer working, and that they can only accept payments in check or money order. I found this strange, that in a time of crisis, why would they make paying remotely offline, and favor you walking into their office and paying in person? Maybe the Apt complex got wind that the middleman might just take the money and run or has become unreliable in recent days?
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    jw williams · 18 days ago
    The calm before the storm